Author Archives: Leigh

New Scientist article looks at the controversy around sugar

So, the “average American” eats 400 calories in sugar per day, most of it from soda, energy drinks, or sports drinks.  If that average American is a fanatic athlete, no problem. For the rest of us, it’s a problem.  Some people blame the rise in metabolic disease, such as diabetes, on the increase in sugar consumption; others think that people who eat sugar just happen to eat more of everything else.

This New Scientist article, “Sickly Sweet,” describes the problem and some of the concerns about how best to handle it.  And if you’re interested, here’s the video by Dr. Robert Lustig mentioned in the article.

Dates for upcoming hypnosis workshops at Whatcom Community College

To register for any of the following workshops, contact Whatcom Community Education at 360-383-3200 or visit WhatcomCommunityEd.com. Feel free to contact me for more info at pghypnosis@nullgmail.com.

Hypnosis for Weight Control II

Part II of a series (3 class sessions in Part I and three in Part II) this class  is designed to continue the transformation of your relationship with with food.  Part II focuses on strengthening motivation for maintaining the healthy changes you’ve made, and developing strategies for dealing with obstacles to your continued well-being and stress-free relationship with food.  Class content is based on research in habit change, willpower, and how our bodies process the foods we choose.   Sessions are Wednesdays from February 26 to March 12.

The Power of Self Hypnosis for Positive Change

This one-session introduction to self hypnosis is designed to prepare you to use self-hypnosis to meet your goals. You’ll practice several ways to go into a hypnotic state, and learn how to craft effective suggestions to support your efforts.  You’ll leave the class ready to use self-hypnosis, a powerful tool for making changes.  Class is at Whatcom Community College on April 29th from 6:30 to 8:30.

Hypnosis for Weight Control I & II

This two-part series of classes at WCC is designed to transform your experience with food and strengthen your relationship with your own body.  Part I focuses on reducing the stress of the battle to control weight, appreciating yourself–and your body–for who you are right now, and learning how to move beyond old patterns that keep you from enjoying a healthy body at a healthy weight.  Class content is based on research in habit change, willpower, and how our bodies process the foods we choose. Part I is on Tuesdays from May 6 to May 20.

Part II focuses on strengthening motivation for maintaining the healthy changes you’ve made, and developing strategies for dealing with obstacles to your continued well-being and stress-free relationship with food.  Class content is based on research in habit change, willpower, and how our bodies process the foods we choose. Part II is on Tuesdays from May 27 to  June 10.

 

New hypnosis workshops at Whatcom Community College in January and February

The Power of Self Hypnosis for Positive Change

I’m offering a new one-session introduction to self hypnosis at Whatcom Community College on January 29th from 6:30 to 8:30. You’ll practice several ways to go into a hypnotic state, and learn how to craft suggestions that can help you meet your goals.  You’ll leave the class ready to use self-hypnosis, a powerful tool for making changes.

Hypnosis for Weight Control I & II

This two-part series of classes at WCC is designed to transform your experience with food and strengthen your relationship with your own body.  It’s time to give up the battle, appreciate yourself for who you are right now, and learn how to move beyond old, stressful patterns that keep you from enjoying a healthy body at a healthy weight.  Class content is based on research in habit change, willpower, and how our bodies process the foods we choose.  First session is on Wednesdays from February 5 to February 19; second session is Wednesdays from February 26 to March 12.

To register, contact Whatcom Community Education at 360-383-3200 or visit WhatcomCommunityEd.com. Feel free to contact me for more info at pghypnosis@nullgmail.com.

 

About HFCS, rats, obesity, and living well . . .

A recent headline says, “High-fructose corn syrup is as addictive as cocaine.”

The headline is about a study of rats fed high fructose corn syrup. It suggests that, because rats responded to large amounts of high fructose corn syrup in the same way that cocaine addicts respond to the drug, foods with high fructose corn syrup could partly explain the global obesity epidemic.

Okay—rats eating high fructose corn syrup point the way to solving the crisis of obesity in humans all over the world.  Hooray for science!

But this isn’t how science works.  Science is a process.  For a good example of the process, see this article in the June 1 Science News. It mentions an article written in 2004, pointing out that use of high fructose corn syrup and obesity had been increasing at the same rate. (The SN article also says that, since 2004, the use of high fructose corn syrup has been decreasing, while obesity has continued to increase.)

I’m willing to believe that high fructose corn syrup is horrible stuff.  I read ingredients, and I avoid “food” that includes it—but then, I avoid most processed food anyway.

And I am fascinated by the way research is illuminating the complex affects of food on the brain.  But let’s not forget that nutrition is a young science.  It’s certainly not advanced enough to tell us how to live well.  Far better to rely on what we already know about living well: eating healthy food that tastes good, getting good exercise that feels good, spending time with people we care about, and doing things that really matter to us.  I’m not saying it’s easy to create that kind of lifestyle these days, but if we can do it, there’s no way an occasional encounter with high fructose corn syrup is going to turn us into addicts.

Type II Diabetes = Alzheimer’s?

Need another reason to take a good hard look at your lifestyle?

The New Scientist article, “Eat Your Way to Dementia,” discusses some surprising research into the effect of insulin on the brain. We know that in Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, and/or the liver, fat, and muscle cells fail to respond to the insulin produced (insulin sensitivity).

What some scientists are saying is that insulin system problems also affects its activity in the brain, where it serves as a signalling hormone.  Rats fed a diet that included high-fructose corn syrup had “learning and memory problems after just 6 weeks, and their brains became less responsive to insulin.”

The article includes a graph of the rise of Type 2 diabetes over the last 30 years. It shows slow growth between 1980 and 1995, and then a steep curve to the present day. In other words, in 1980, about 2.5 out of 100 people (1 out of 40) people we knew had Type 2 diabetes. In 2010, about 7 out of 100 ( 1 out of 14) had diabetes–and there’s no reason to think the increase will slow any time soon.