A little activity can take us a long way

People love to talk about how much exercise we “should” get. I wonder how helpful it is to approach the notion of exercise from that perspective: how much should I get? I suppose for the folks who are into doing everything right, it might be helpful. Or the folks who are seriously into exploring and quantifying every aspect of their lives—and they at least will be evaluating the recommendations against their experience.

But lots of people suffer from a learned aversion to exercise, and I know this kind of direction is not helpful. So if this is you, take heart. It turns out that when it comes to the health benefits of moving around—a little goes a long way.

This news is from a British study of 63,591 middle-aged people, over 8 years. It didn’t matter whether they followed the recommended guidelines for a certain number of hours of exercise per day, or simply went for a long walk on a weekend day—a lesser amount of exercise was still effective in preventing disease.

In terms of physical health, although there are studies supporting specific benefits of many different kinds of strenuous exercise—weight training, running, yoga, etc.—all those recommendations about how much of each kind of exercise we need don’t matter as much as making sure we get any exercise at all. A little bit of activity still conveys real health benefits.

I suspect it also has similar benefits in the other areas that regular, more frequent exercise is known to provide. I’m thinking about one of my favorite passages from Kelly McGonigal’s The Willpower Instinct, in which she lists the surprise effects of a study on enhancing self control (also known as willpower). The participants, who had all been sedentary before the study, were given a gym membership for two months. Typically they used it once a week at first, but most were up to 3 times per week by the end of the study. The results? Improvements in attention (less distractible), a reduction in smoking, drinking, caffeine use, eating junk food, and watching TV. They also made more healthy food choices, and spent more time studying. They spent less money on impulse purchases, and saved more money. They felt more in control of their emotions.

Truly, moving around makes everything work better. And it doesn’t matter how small the initial effort is—you’ll feel the benefits. By the way, here’s a list of things to try, in case you don’t have a favorite activity already.

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