Ten years of working with clients and students on hypnosis for weight control . . . time flies . . .

Another weight control class at Whatcom Community College has just ended, and as usual I am thinking over what we covered, and thinking too about other ideas and information that students and clients might find useful. Specifically, I’m wondering about adding more information on the newer research that challenges common assumptions about weight loss and weight control.

My first experience with hypnosis for weight loss was driven by my own experience of the problem; as you might expect, that’s pretty common for folks in this field. I set up the first class based on hypnosis to support what the conventional wisdom said was the path to change—balancing calories in and calories out, for example, and too much fat is bad and the same goes for processed food. (Now I now think good fat is good and bad fat is bad, and I think processed food is not only bad, but also seriously harmful when eaten daily.)

The very first class was the last time I followed that particular part of the lesson plan. The class participants were almost unanimous in telling me that they didn’t need nutritional advice—and it was clear that they knew as much as I did about the calorie balance theory, and they were still struggling.

So I dug deeper—again, learning from students but also from my own yo-yo pattern of weight loss-gain-loss, etc. I started reading research on habit change; I discovered the National Weight Control Registry; I started reading about neuroscience and stress and cognition and motivation, and all the other places my reading took me. I’ve never stopped. It’s led me to a different understanding of the problem, and along the way I have also lost weight. Best of all, I’m not alone. Many students and clients have lost weight too.

What I discovered, in the end, is that the problem is not really about the weight. Or, perhaps more accurately, it’s not only about the weight. Instead, it’s about all the things that happen to cause us to override our bodies’ natural sense of what we need for—or from—nourishment. That realization started my shift away from conventional advice on weight loss, both for the classes and my work with individual clients.

I started this post thinking about what we know now about weight control, and what we thought we knew way back when. I was wondering if I should add information about the research I’ve read that explains why I don’t care about calories, and I do care about nutrients from real food.

I think I’ve answered my own question: yes, there is so much recent scientifically validated information that directly affects any of us who’s concerned about nutrition, health, or weight control. So much of what we thought we knew (fat is bad, etc.) is wrong—no wonder we have such a hard time sorting through all the static.

As a start, I’ll put together a list of resources—food for thought—and when I do I’ll post it here on the website as well as sharing it with students and clients.

We’re so fortunate to have beautiful parks

Bellingham, where I live, is blessed with great parks, thanks to good leadership and voters willing to pay the freight—wonderful, popular, well-used and well-cared for parks. I’ve used at least one of these parks more or less on a daily basis for years. I was out today, just for a short time, for the welcome chance to connect with the landscape—paths through trees and green hills, the sight of the glittering reflections on water.

The parks are especially glorious on a summer day—the parade of people, or people and their dog-friends, all elevated by the summer sun, the beckoning lake, the trails—dry for once this time of year . . . .

But I love the experience of being on the trails anytime—watching the progress of the seasons. And I also like the sense of being part of a community of the regular walkers. We see each other so many days, for years at a time, and though I have very few personal connections with the other regulars outside the park, we recognize in each other the shared love of this experience, of being in touch with nature in this place.

I love watching runners, too. It’s like watching a dance—I don’t mean choreographed professionals, but just the raw personality that shows through as people let themselves out, let their bodies stretch and move. The people I see at the parks are obviously running for the joy of it, their bodies remembering what it is to be a kid, with kid energy, and the physical resilience of youth.

Okay, it’s also true that while I see a lot of joyful runners, I also see some who don’t look quite so joyful, including some who look as though they wish they were anywhere else.

Watching as I do makes me remember that our bodies are designed to move in so many ways—many more than the linear patterns of walking a path, or bending forward or back—we were born with built-in flexibility and the ability to balance. But as the years go by, we don’t tend to move the way we could as kids.

One of the nice things about movement classes is the opportunity they give to rediscover some of the many ways our bodies can move, especially if we haven’t been active in a while. I mean classes like Tai Chi, yoga, dance, to name just a few. In the last few years, I find that yoga classes are no longer about trying for the perfect form, but more about discovering the benefits of simple stretching and using muscles that otherwise don’t get much of a workout in the course of a day. It’s humbling, I confess, but I’ll take that. After all, that’s another thing I recognize that I need more of.

What’s new this Fall

Fall has definitely arrived in the ’Ham. We had such a long run of summer’s hot dry days it’s been a shock to return to normal weather: clouds, soft rain, the greening grass, ready for one last burst of growth before winter.

It’s also time for me to prepare for the next round of classes on using hypnosis to support weight control. I started these classes ten years ago, and each fall I am rethinking the classes, and re-organizing material, adding new information, finding new strategies, etc. So much of that first class has evolved beyond recognition, except the use of hypnosis to support healthy changes. This time I’m emphasizing the focus on using hypnosis to strengthen self-compassion, so essential to progress in this area.

One topic that I am glad to see getting attention in the press these days is a critique of the ways the medicalization of obesity has affected the medical community and those who inevitably suffer from the blame game—internalizing the shame of being overweight. We really need to stop focusing on the weight and focus instead on healthy behaviors, on helping people figure out for themselves what helps them stay healthy and strong—and the answer is never on a chart filled in with numbers.

If you are interested, or know anyone else who may be interested, in the class or how I work with the issue, please do send them my contact info. I’m always happy to talk about what’s possible with hypnosis.

Poor Sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease

I’ve decided to offer classes in using hypnosis to get better sleep–the first is scheduled for March 24 at 10 am. It’s nearly full, so I’ve scheduled a second on April 21, also at 10 am. If you’re interested, contact me, and I’ll send you the details.

Today’s post is about just one of many reasons this topic concerns me.

An article by sleep scientist Matthew Walker* in the October 2017 issue of New Scientist describes a mechanism through which Alzheimer’s disease disrupts memory consolidation—and the mechanism has to do with the poor sleep experienced by people with the disease. The cause itself is not clear, but the connection is clearly established, and it’s a compelling reason for us to address any poor sleep habits we may have.

The connection has to do with the effect of the buildup of toxic amyloid proteins characteristic in the disease, which over time reduces the amount of NREM (non-rapid eye movement) slow wave sleep we typically get during the night. And although it’s common to get less NREM sleep as we age, normal aging doesn’t usually affect the slow wave sleep we get.

Slow wave sleep is responsible for saved memories; in other words it’s involved in the process of shifting memories from short-term to long-term storage. The research shows that more toxic amyloid buildup is correlated with more disruption of slow wave sleep, and more loss of memory consolidation.

It turns out that the area of the brain that is predominantly affected by the disease is the frontal lobe, which is also the part of the brain that is responsible for starting our slow wave sleep phases. The research has confirmed that it’s not just a coincidence that people with Alzheimer’s disease have poor sleep—their poor sleep is qualitatively different from normal sleep changes associated with healthy aging.

Here’s a weird bit of the Alzheimer’s puzzle: how do the toxic plaques cause memory loss?

It’s puzzling because even though amyloid deposits only accumulate in some parts of the brain, they don’t accumulate in the areas of the brain associated with memory. So what is the connection between the disease and memory loss?

It took a sleep scientist to come up with an answer. Here’s his theory, in his own words:

We already knew that in young healthy adults, the slow brainwaves of deep NREM sleep effectively hit the “save” button on new memories, helping us retain what we have recently learned. Sleep also helps us access and thus remember past experiences.

If amyloid was blocking deep NREM sleep in Alzheimer’s disease, then perhaps this loss of youthful deep sleep prevents older adults from being able to save new memories and hold on to experiences past?

He designed a study to test this theory, giving patients new information at night and then testing their recollection the next morning, after monitoring their sleep. The results? Patients with more amyloid deposits in the middle frontal regions of the brain had the most severe loss of deep sleep, and they were unable to remember the new material.

The connection is there—disrupted deep NREM sleep is the missing link between amyloid and memory loss. So far, studies of older adults with sleep disorders confirat treating sleep problems slows the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease by up to 10 years.

Again, although the research does not show a causal relationship between poor sleep and Alzheimer’s disease, clearly getting better sleep now can reduce our risk significantly. And further, since the symptoms so disrupt quality of life, it makes sense to me that we choose to do whatever we can to protect our sleep, and our memory.

By the way, the studies also showed that just as prescription medications for sleep do not work beyond a small placebo effect in helping people fall asleep, they do nothing to mitigate the loss of slow wave sleep.

Sleep well tonight. Do contact me if you’re interested in exploring hypnosis to help you get healthy sleep, either one-on-one, or as part of a group.

* This post is a summary of part of Dr. Walker’s article, and any errors are mine.  Do check out his article–he’s a good writer.

How’s your sleep?

I ask this question of all my clients now, because I found that so many people I saw individually and in workshops mentioned poor sleep during the course of discussing other issues, from weight to anxiety, or anger, or chronic pain, etc. I now know that most of my clients have problems getting good sleep, whether or not that’s the issue they come to work on.

I’ve just had a fabulous week of great sleep!

Okay, I think this is an opportunity for one of those “There are two kinds of people . . . .” statements:  There are people who, on reading this, will feel a rush of emotions—envy, happy-for-you, irritation, or despair of ever experiencing that feeling of true rest. And there are people who are puzzled and wondering what all the fuss is about.

I suspect more people are in the first group, based on what I hear from clients, and from the CDC’s findings that 50-70% of people suffer from a sleep disorder.

I’ve had a long time to wrestle with getting enough sleep, and along the way I’ve learned a great deal about the kinds of things that can affect my sleep positively or negatively. And of course I’ve read pretty widely on the topic. Most of what I read is in the category of sleep hygiene—the things we can do to ourselves to get better sleep. Here’s a great list from the NIH, by the way.

But I recently read a great article in Scientific American online “The Secret to a Better Night’s Sleep: A sense of purpose?  The article refers to a study done at Northwestern University School of Medicine.  Here’s a statement from the study report’s conclusion: “a higher level of meaning and purpose in life among older adults is related to better sleep quality and appears to be protective against symptoms of sleep apnea and RLS.” 

How cool is that?

In my practice, I’ve been incorporating a focus on values with every client, initially because of studies like this one—studies confirming that when we focus on our values, we are more likely to experience positive progress toward the changes we want to see in our lives. And it’s truly transformative, I’m finding.

We can learn how to get better sleep, one step at a time, as we make simple changes to our environment, our behavior, and how we think about ourselves. It doesn’t sound simple, but I assure you, it doesn’t have to be hard.

I’m excited about this topic, and about what I’ve been learning about the science of sleep. One of my current projects is putting together a hypnosis workshop about how to craft your own great sleep experience. Stay tuned for more info. 

And Happy New Year! I wish you great sleep in the coming year.

Strength training supports healthy weight loss at any age

According to a recent Harvard Medical School bulletin:

If you’re trying to lose weight by cutting calories, you’re likely losing muscle, too. But strength training can counteract this effect. According to a research review in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, on average, 27% of the weight lost by dieting is muscle. Those who combined dieting with cardio exercise cut muscle loss in half. But when participants combined dieting and resistance training (strength training), all of the pounds lost were fat. What’s more, the more muscle you have and the stronger your muscles are—the more benefits you’ll get beyond weight loss. You’ll develop a slimmer, firmer figure and have the energy to be more active. And, you’ll get more from cardio workouts because you’ll be able to go faster and last longer.

This quote is from an email about the Harvard Medical School’s publication, Strength and Power Training for All Ages.

I’m really not a gym rat. I like being outside; I love being present in nature, up close and personal. I feel relaxed and nourished by the fresh air, in touch with the seasons, and just plain grateful to be able to listen to birds as I walk at my own pace, while my mind wanders.

I’m really not a gym rat, although as the resident of a rainy state, I also appreciate knowing that when it gets too much (winter!), I can go inside and get most of the benefits that in better weather, I’d prefer to get outside.

The thing is, since I don’t love the gym, I need these reminders that strength training matters, so I’ll make an effort to get the strength training I need to stay strong. I’ll remind myself to keep up the daily plank pose. And 20 minutes or so, one or two days a week, at the gym for a few more weight exercises is well worth it–after all, we’re in this for the long haul, right?

Magic wands for change

I start a new series of hypnosis workshops in October, and it’s been fun to prepare the new classes and get ready for the ones I’ve been doing for years.  In fact, I’ve been working with people who struggle with weight issues for 10 years now, and I have learned so much from the people who have chosen to share their process with me. It’s a complex issue—so personal, and yet affected by so many family, or social, or cultural, or economic influences. I have so much gratitude for the years of learning from this work, and so much respect for the people involved.

Because it is such a complex issue, many people find themselves hopeless or overwhelmed, even though they would like to be able to do something to help themselves. And it’s hard to pick out the 1 thing that could help everyone who wants to do something about the problem. Everyone is different, and my personal magic wand might be just an ugly old twig to the next person.

But I do have a few magic wands to recommend, nonetheless. There’s a selection process, of course, since we are each unique, and when it comes to magic, it’s not one size fits all. It’s more like this: which one makes us feel strong, and helps us accept ourselves, just as we are—because that’s what it takes to fight the forces (personal, family, social, etc.) that contribute to feelings of hopelessness or overwhelm.

It’s a tall order, but fortunately we don’t have to make the choice blindly. A little bit of self-reflection can point us in the right direction. When we know what truly matters to us—our values—it’s easier to make the right choice. Besides, these are simple things; if you can’t decide, you could try them all and see what feels good.

Here are the magic wands I recommend—and by magic wand, I mean one thing—one small thing—that just about anyone can do just about any time, to start making progress on the path to a more healthy way of spending our days. The 3 magic wands below are listed in an order that matters to me, but the first one would not necessarily be the right first one for you.

Magic wand 1: Moving more.

Maybe that’s a goal of walking 10 minutes a day to start. (Or depending where you’re starting from, walking 20 minutes each day or more.) Maybe it’s dancing at the sink while you’re doing dishes. Maybe it’s stretching every time you get out of a chair. Maybe it’s taking a yoga class, or doing chair tai chi at the library. You get the drift: whatever you can reliably do and feel good doing.

Magic wand 2: Practicing gratitude.

This is about looking for something to be grateful for, maybe just one thing every day. Maybe you keep a journal or maybe you just stop and think about it at least once a day. Maybe you get more creative and decide it has to be something new and different every day, or set timers during the day.

Magic wand 3: Meditation.

Maybe you start with a 10-minute guided meditation from the internet, or maybe take a class or join a group, working up to your own daily practice. For me it’s mindfulness meditation, but there are lots of options out there.

Of course, there’s also nothing wrong with doing all three, or more. In fact, for some folks, at certain times, diving into a completely new lifestyle can be exhilarating and ultimately the right first step. (Perhaps this approach should be magic wand number 4.)

These sound like small things (except #4). And they are small, and they are simple, but they are also powerful. Somehow—and this is why I call them magic, because I don’t know how it works—these small things can each lead us to recognize that we do have the power to affect how we live our lives, and that is the true beginning of making change. 

Right now I’m grateful that I get to do this work, and looking forward to new classes, and people on the path to change.

New classes: on transforming stress, and dealing with pain

Two new classes this Fall quarter at Whatcom Community College, one on the new science of stress, and another on dealing with pain. 

Want to transform your relationship with stress? The new science on stress validates the power of our minds over the way we experience stressful events. On Thursday October 12th, I’ll present some of the myths and the new science about stress, and we’ll discuss the ways we typically react when we experience stress. We’ll also learn some simple ways to mitigate the harmful effects and boost the positives—and contrary to what we’ve been told, there are many positives that come out of stressful times.

Occasional or chronic pain is a reality for most of us at one time or another, and yet most pain medicines are problematic when used regularly—in fact, there is no cure for chronic pain. Typical common causes for pain include headaches, low back pain, nerve damage, recovery from surgery or other medical treatment, and other disabilities. Any of these can affect quality of life, including things like getting the sleep or activity we need to stay positive and healthy.

Hypnosis is a proven method for mitigating or reducing pain, and hypnosis has no side effects other than relaxation. In this class on October 26th, you’ll learn how, by practicing at home, you can use hypnosis to get more control over pain and its effects.

Register for either class at Whatcom Community College, by email, or by phone at 360-383-3200.

And by all means contact me with any questions about either of these new classes.